How to write and file comments on the #FAA #NPRM on #drones “remote ID” #UAS #UAV #Drone

On December 26th, 2019, the FAA released its Notice of Proposed Rulemaking setting standards and requirements for all small UAS/model aircraft/quadcopters flown in the U.S.  The FAA has opened up a 60-day period during which members of the public may file comments about the proposal. We ave until

To learn about the proposal, go  here and click on the proceeding title.

On the next page you can access the NPRM document and supporting documents. You may also click on Comment Now! to submit your own comments. You may also upload a Word document file, if you wish.

Note that the NPRM is 319 pages long and there are hundreds, if not thousands, of pages of supporting documents. This is a very complex rulemaking and the FAA has made it difficult for the general public to understand the details – we do not have teams of lawyers, engineers and other staff to go through all this.

How This Process Works

The Administrative Procedures Act requires that new proposed rules be posted to the public and the public be given an opportunity to comment on those rules. Unfortunately, the law does not require the agencies to listen to that feedback; it only requires collection of the feedback. An agency could, if it wished, accept the public’s comments, ignore them and issue its final rule. In practice, that does not normally happen.

Instead, the agency will  analyze and remove duplicate filings, form letters and so on. Possibly  they will be “counted” but the specific points raised are  only counted once.

Agency staff will then begin reading the comments and identifying each unique issue. If dozens of people identify the same issues, then this is coalesced into a single issue point.

Once they have collected all of the issues raised, the FAA will proceed to interpret the issues and determine how to modify the proposed rule.

Once this lengthy process is completed, the FAA will issue its final rulemaking. In that document, they will list each of the key issues raised and explain how the resolved or did not resolve the points raised.

Good Comments / Bad Comments

The best comments are those that identify specific issues, explain the problems, provide facts and logic to back up your discussion, and suggest recommended alternatives.

The worst comments are those that rant and whine or which just copy form letters. These comments may be ignored by the FAA.

Continue reading How to write and file comments on the #FAA #NPRM on #drones “remote ID” #UAS #UAV #Drone

FAA plans to regulate home built model aircraft out of existence – you need to file comments now

The FAA’s Notice of Proposed Rule Making for Remote ID goes well beyond just remote ID. I have not had time – yet – to read the entire proposal, but it does include a requirement that most all model aircraft be tracked in real time, once per second. Where “Internet is available” (which they mean 3G to 5G cell service), the position information must be relayed through a phone app to an Internet cloud database for real time tracking. They propose that third parties will run this air traffic management system and everyone will be charged an annual subscription fee. They’ve pulled a number out of a hat and say this might cost $30 per year (presumably PER aircraft); if this estimate is as accurate as the Affordable Care Act estimates were, then it will probably cost more like $100 per year. They will also change pilot registration to per aircraft registration, charging $5 per aircraft to be registered.

This is contrary to the recommendation of their own consensus of stakeholders advisory committee which recommend EITHER Internet tracking OR broadcast remote ID depending on the use and application. The FAA instead said it wants BOTH to be mandated. It is not entirely clear what happens when Internet is not available, and how they define that. If you have TMobile and no service, but Verizon has coverage are you required to also have Verizon service? While you can fly without Internet service such as in remote lands, there may be enforced restrictions such as a 400 foot horizontal limit (enforced by the certified quadcopter controller).

Continue reading FAA plans to regulate home built model aircraft out of existence – you need to file comments now

“No glasses” 3D Holograms?

Light Field Labs has raised an additional US $28 million in funding to develop and produce free air holographic display technology. They are said to have a working prototype now and the additional funding will enable them to scale up to an actual product.

The aim is to create holographic objects that appear to be three dimensional and float in space without head-mounted gear such as augmented reality or virtual reality goggles.”

Source: Light Field Labs : 3D Holograms no glasses Deep Dive – fxguide

The principle people behind the technology had developed the Lytro camera technology. As best I can tell, it may be similar to a digital implementation of a conventional, analog, film-based hologram. In the original hologram technology, you look at a flat image that is, basically, like a window pane. As you move to the left or right, you see the true 3D image visible from that point in space. In the laser-based hologram, the window pane is a film that has recorded light interference patterns.

From the description down the page, here, my interpretation is they have created a currently small window pane that is replicating the light interference hologram concept, but in the digital domain. Obviously, it takes a tremendous amount of computational horsepower and for video, high bandwidth, both of which are becoming available as tech advances.

I presume, also, that this technology can be used to project objects in front of the viewing plane, as is done in stereoscopic 3D. In other words, actors or objects can be appear to be between you and the viewing screen – or behind the screen.

This tech creates true 3D that does not require glasses for viewing.

Another reporter does not understand 3D

3D box office revenues have taken a steep dive, with box office sales at their lowest level in eight years. It may finally be time to say sayonara to those bulky tinted glasses.

I would be overjoyed on the day that 3D finally bites the dust. The tinted glasses overly darken the screen, and the rare effects that cater to the technology often only serve to make me woozy.

Source: 3D Movie Box Office Sales Hit Lowest Level in 8 Years

The reporter writes about films but when it comes to 3D, is a dufus – movie theater 3D glasses are light weight, clear, polarizing filters, not “bulky tinted glasses”. The reporter believes she is wearing tinted glasses when she is not – apparently does not understand the concept of polarized lenses. Since she does not like 3D (sample size n = 1), then no one should enjoy 3D. Wow. If she doesn’t like 3D, then she does not have to watch it, but alas, she wants 3D to be gone because no one should enjoy 3D 🙂

Continue reading Another reporter does not understand 3D

‘Avatar 2’ sequel in 2020 could kick start #3D again

Avatar was a huge success and caused many studios to rush out 3D conversions of existing 2D content – but which were, frankly, terrible conversions.

Certain studios took the time to make high-quality 3D films, but some films that were put into 3D were garbage. As a result, not all 3D was created equal,” says Eric Handler, a media analyst with MKM Partners. “There was a lot that people didn’t want to pay a premium for anymore.”

There’s hope from certain sectors that the release of “Avatar 2” in 2021 could reignite passion for the format. Cameron is planning three subsequent sequels in the coming years, with a fifth installment wrapping things up in 2027.

Source: ‘Avatar’ Anniversary: James Cameron’s Box Office Epic Turns 10 – Variety

Watch Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker in 3D?

The reviewer notes that significant scenes are very dimly lit, very dark, and these types of scenes do very poorly in 3D:

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker isn’t the worst 3D conversion in Star Wars history, but it certainly doesn’t hit the lofty heights of Star Wars: The Force Awakens’ 3D conversion efforts. A decent end to a saga’s third dimensional run, there are stumbling blocks that could have been avoided, but weren’t.

If you’re a 3D fanatic, this presentation isn’t a total waste of time, but it won’t rival some of the best examples of the medium we’ve seen in recent years. However, if you’ve been catching up on all the other films in 2D, you might not want to dive into the world of Star Wars’ 3D universe with this particular film.

Source: To 3D Or Not To 3D: Buy The Right Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker Ticket

I am a 3D fan but will probably not see this in 3D. Partially, I need to drive about 20+ miles (30+ km) to the nearest theater where it is showing in 3D versus driving just over 1 mile (1.6 km) to see it in 2D 🙂

3d.coldstreams.com has moved to a new server (this one)

On December 18, 2019, my Internet web hosting provider announced they are shutting down in February 2020. I am now in process of relocating my 5 web sites to a new web host (and once this is done, a 6th site located elsewhere will also be relocated).

This post you are reading right now is on the new web host, however, the final appearance of this page and some other key items still need to be updated. These final fixes will occur over the next week or so.

Unfortunately, the instructions I had for migrating a WordPress web site to another server were incorrect and only “sort of worked”. These incorrect instructions appear widely on the Internet, unfortunately. After migrating 3 of my 5 web sites, I discovered the instructions did not lead to a fully functioning web site. Consequently, this process has become more complex and time consuming than expected.

I ended up inventing my own migration strategy however it may require that I temporarily run a brief function on the old web server. To do that, I may need to temporarily re-assign the DNS to point back at the old web host server, and then reset it back to this one. That will occur sometime during the coming week (but I have an idea that might avoid this step altogether – we will see!). As a result, the appearance of this web page will be going back and forth during the coming week or so and will not be finalized for another week.

The following web sites are affected and will be in a state of transition during the migration over the coming week.

Olympus says it has no plans to sell its camera business

“For Imaging, however, we currently have no plans to sell the business. The task is therefore to stabilize and strengthen its market position. To achieve that, we are actively running marketing activities, and have already established a clear and exciting product roadmap for the coming months and years. We are actively pursuing future technology developments that will enhance photography and video for creators. Furthermore, Imaging is and will continue to be an important technology and innovation driver for our other businesses.

Source: Olympus addresses rumors of sale | Photofocus

A few days ago, a Russian blogger posted rumors that Olympus Imaging staff were looking for new jobs and that the camera division would be sold or shut down in January.

Then Bloomberg ran a report that implied the Olympus CEO was not opposed to selling the division, but did so in a unusual way without direct quotes. This only furthered the rumor. (Bloomberg ran a fake news story last year claiming a secret chip was installed on servers at Amazon, Apple and other U.S. companies during manufacturing by agents of the Chinese government, for the purpose of spying. All of the companies and Homeland Security denied any such chip existed.)

Olympus has replied with a statement that it has no plans to sell the business.

The weirdest is that the micro four thirds community that posts to online forums, is the most negative group of people ever met. Those that post frequently focus on gloom and doom and seize upon every poorly source rumor to further their victimization mentality. I do not get this attitude at all.

Olympus is still recovering from their mega accounting scandal in 2011 and like all camera makers, is in the midst of a shrinking market that impacts all camera makers. They have, however, continued to introduce new cameras and lenses and have moved manufacturing to a new factory in Vietnam.

Guide to 3D VR video and photos